Pyrseas/PostgreSQL Feature Matrix

In my last post, I wrote—referring to the state of Pyrseas after version 0.5 is released:

The only gaps left are TABLESPACE, GROUP/ROLE and the EXTENSIONs added in PG 9.1.

I’m afraid I should’ve double checked the list of 9.1 SQL CREATE statements. I missed COLLATIONs. I’ve created a new page, Feature Matrix, that shows the correct picture, which will be updated as subsequent releases are made.

More Database Tools?

It’s been over year since I started blogging on these pages about Pyrseas and version control. In a month it will also be the first anniversary of the initial commit to GitHub. Much code and many words have flown under these “bridges,” so this seems an appropriate time to reflect.

When I discovered Andromeda, I was looking for a framework to do simple (CRUD-type) database updates

  • with more flexibility (read, programability) than pgAdmin or phpPgAdmin
  • without being tied to an object-relational mapper, either built-in as in Django or external as SQLAlchemy (Pylons/Pyramid)
  • without having to write repetitive code, either SQL or ORM.

Andromeda appeared to satisfy these objectives (although I wasn’t thrilled about having to customize it in PHP).

When I conceived dbtoyaml, I was being lazy: reacting to Andromeda’s requirement to handcraft a YAML description of a database before I could use it to manage SQL changes to it. I thought: why not create the YAML from the database catalogs?

Since my concept for a YAML database specification didn’t match well to Andromeda’s, that led to yamltodb, my attempt to recreate the SQL “diff’ing” features of Andromeda in Python. Andromeda did it using the information_schema catalogs, which made it portable to other DBMSs that had those. Andromeda also did the comparisons by issuing SQL queries (which didn’t perform well). I chose to use the pg_catalog tables and did the comparisons directly on Python structures.

At first, I had intended to only diff schemas and tables and not much more, since that sufficed for my purposes. However, Peter Eisentraut’s comment eventually convinced me that Pyrseas had to support ALL PostgreSQL DDL features1. I’m very pleased with what was accomplished. Pyrseas 0.5, to be released shortly2, will add support for TEXTSEARCH and FOREIGN DATA WRAPPER related objects. The only gaps left are TABLESPACE, GROUP/ROLE and the EXTENSIONs added in PG 9.1.

2012 brought another turn of events. My post on the controversy between Chris Travers and Tony Marston on whether business logic ought to reside in the database led to collaboration with Roger Hunwicks to create dbextend, a tool to automate database augmentation. A first submission was made and work continues on that front.

The latter effort raises other possibilities. For example, since yamltodb already knows how to create nearly all PG objects, it would be trivial to create a schemadump utility (equivalent to pg_dump -s). Another potential tool of interest to PostgreSQL advocates: dbtoyaml for other databases (mytoyaml, oratoyaml anyone?) together with a conversion utility that operates on the YAML specification so it can be accepted by the PG-only yamltodb (the YAML converter seems should be easier than editing SQL statements). The YAML/JSON output from dbtoyaml is amenable to other analysis or automation tasks.

I hope to get back to my database user interface “dream” … one of these days, but in the meantime, I’m glad for having taken these detours. I’d like to thank those who helped along the way: Josh Berkus, Robert Brewer, Adam Cornett, Ronan Dunklau, Peter Eisentraut, David Fetter, Dickson Guedes, Matthias Howell, Roger Hunwicks, Toon Koppelaars, Marko Kreen, Fabrízio Mello, Regina Obe, Filip Rembialkowski, Dariusz Suchojad, Daniele Varrazzo, Evgeni Vasilev, David Wheeler and others I may have missed.


1 Actually, Josh Berkus was the first one who mentioned (in a private email) that I ought to support all PG objects.
2 And just in time for PyCon, I’m happy to announce that it will support Python 3.